Old Algorithms

My wife, my three young boys and I recently joined some friends of ours to venture into a corn maze... I have been deprived of this pleasure, and this is the first time I have ever enjoyed this unique adventure...
The maze we ventured into -- actually two mazes in one -- was contrived to resemble dinosaurs, with which my eldest at seven years is thoroughly fascinated. Maze number one was a triceratops and a tyrannosaur, maze number two was a brontosaur and a pteranodon, they were interconnected via the heads of the brontosaur and tyrannosaur (see illustration).

I saw an aerial shot before we entered, and I also bought a map in a sealed envelope - which they stipulated: "If you come back with your map unopened, you get your dollar back."
Okay, the stage is set... Who remembers the set of algorithms I am about to describe?
Closed systems (or systems capable of being described as closed) such as these mazes have two simple algorithmic solutions: Always Right, and Always Left.

Depending on where you start, your either traverse the edge or the interior of the maze, but you always "solve" the maze - unless the center is the solution (or a couple of other non-corn maze issues)...

We began the trek with our neighbors and I told everyone of this methodology, whereby I got a couple of chuckles, but everyone followed nonetheless...

I first encountered this algorithm in an independent study class I arranged for my senior year in High School... 1985... I had a TRS-80 (they got Tandy1000's the next year...) with a version of Pascal onboard (I think it was Turbo Pascal). First, I ported a random maze creation program I had encountered in Commodore Magazine from Commodore 64 assembly to Pascal, then I worked out a "mouse" to run the random mazes.